Syllabus for Climate Change Leadership: Power, Politics and Culture

Klimatledarskap - makt, politik och kultur

Syllabus

  • 15 credits
  • Course code: 1MV077
  • Education cycle: First cycle
  • Main field(s) of study and in-depth level: Sustainable Development G2F

    Main field(s) of study and in-depth level

    The code indicates the education cycle and in-depth level of the course in relation to other courses within the same main field of study according to the requirements for general degrees:

    First cycle
    G1N: has only upper-secondary level entry requirements
    G1F: has less than 60 credits in first-cycle course/s as entry requirements
    G1E: contains specially designed degree project for Higher Education Diploma
    G2F: has at least 60 credits in first-cycle course/s as entry requirements
    G2E: has at least 60 credits in first-cycle course/s as entry requirements, contains degree project for Bachelor of Arts/Bachelor of Science
    GXX: in-depth level of the course cannot be classified.

    Second cycle
    A1N: has only first-cycle course/s as entry requirements
    A1F: has second-cycle course/s as entry requirements
    A1E: contains degree project for Master of Arts/Master of Science (60 credits)
    A2E: contains degree project for Master of Arts/Master of Science (120 credits)
    AXX: in-depth level of the course cannot be classified.

  • Grading system: Fail (U), Pass (3), Pass with credit (4), Pass with distinction (5)
  • Established: 2016-03-10
  • Established by: The Faculty Board of Science and Technology
  • Applies from: week 34, 2016
  • Entry requirements: 60 credits
  • Responsible department: Department of Earth Sciences

Learning outcomes

On completion of the course, the student should be able to:

  • critically relate to prerequisites, possibilities and limitations for a sustainable leadership within the climate field;
  • from an environmental historical perspective critically compare different explanatory models of how changes in the climate have influenced different societies;
  • interpret different theoretical models concerning the emergence of the industrial society as a cause for anthropogenic climate change;
  • critically review and analyse global power relations and apply an equity perspective on the climate change challenge;
  • analyse and interpret different theories of leadership, cooperation, organisation and communication for a functioning climate change leadership;
  • explain the connections between climate change, conflicts and geopolitical power relations;
  • analyse and evaluate different proposed solutions and their opportunities, limitations and risks within the climate field;
  • apply skills within leadership, cooperation, organisation and communication specifically connected to different contemporary and future scenarios within the climate field.

Content

The course starts with an introduction and critical discussion of basic concepts and conceptions about climate changes, sustainable development, climate change leadership, science, power and politics. The science debate concerning climate change and different scientific disciplines perspective on the climate change challenge are also focused on during the first part of the course. From the initial concept orientation, follows a basic, natural science overview of climate change over geological and historical time, and a number of environmental historical case studies that illustrate different societies interaction, adaptation and collapse in relation to climate changes and changes in the surrounding world. After that, the basic reasons for anthropogenic climate change during the history of the industrialisation are studied. On the basis of the multidisciplinary understanding within natural science, environmental history and economic history established during the first half of the course, a framework and prerequisites for a functioning climate change leadership is then defined, with focus on leadership, communication, cooperation and organisation for a sustainable development and stabilised climate. The discussion is then problematised further by a number of overarching perspectives within political philosophy, ethics, equity, international agreements, conflicts, conflict solution, the matter of responsibility and ecological debt. The course closes with a number of applied case studies based on different contemporary and future scenarios as for example biofuels and rising food prices; disaster management and different methods for climate adaptation; infrastructure and restructuring of society; future conflicts and cooperations.

Instruction

The teaching consists of lectures, seminars and workshops. The lectures are given by guest lecturers from different academic disciplines and other relevant societal sectors. The teaching method is based on active student participation and critical thinking.

Assessment

The student is examined through written assignments before and active participation in seminars (8 credits) and at the end of the course through written and oral presentation of a larger project work (7 credits).

Reading list

Reading list

Applies from: week 01, 2019

  • Digital course reader

    CEMUS,

    A digital course reader will be provided by the course coordinators and will encompass about 2-3 recommended articles per week relating to the current themes.

    Mandatory

  • Lieberman, Benjamin A.; Gordon, Elizabeth Climate change in human history : prehistory to the present

    London: Bloomsbury Academic, 2018

    Find in the library

    Mandatory

  • Martusewicz, Rebecca A.; Edmundson, Jeff.; Lupinacci, John. EcoJustice education : toward diverse, democratic, and sustainable communities

    Second edition.: New York: Routledge, 2015.

    Find in the library

    Mandatory

  • Stoknes, Per Espen. What we think about when we try not to think about global warming : toward a new psychology of climate action

    White River Junction, Vermont: Chelsea Green Publishing, [2015]

    http://cgreen.stisonbooks.com/images/books/native/9781603585835.jpg

    Find in the library

    Mandatory

Reading list revisions