Master’s studies

Syllabus for Social Psychological Foundations of Intergroup Conflict

Social Psychological Foundations of Intergroup Conflict

  • 7.5 credits
  • Course code: 2FK048
  • Education cycle: Second cycle
  • Main field(s) of study and in-depth level: Peace and Conflict Studies A1N
  • Grading system: Fail (U), Pass (G), Pass with distinction (VG).
  • Established: 2015-05-25
  • Established by: The Department Board
  • Applies from: week 27, 2015
  • Entry requirements: A Bachelor of Arts degree with at least 90 credits in courses in social sciences.
  • Responsible department: Department of Peace and Conflict Research

Learning outcomes

After the course, students should be able to:

  • Critically evaluate contending approaches concerning the social psychological foundations of intergroup conflict
  • Trace these various approaches back to their historical and intellectual origins
  • Gain a clear understanding of the cognitive, motivational and affective aspects of intergroup conflict
  • Identify the conditions under which in-group bias is transformed into intergroup prejudice
  • Identify the conditions under which intergroup contact reduces or increases prejudice

Content

This course aims to provide students with a thorough understanding of the social-psychological processes involved in intergroup conflict. The course will contribute to a deeper understanding of the cognitive, motivational and affective aspects of intergroup conflict and bias, as well as the conditions under which in-group bias may be transformed into intergroup prejudice, discrimination and violence. Contending approaches on how to structure intergroup contact in order to reduce intergroup prejudice will be examined. To achieve this, the course familiarises students with key literature that, over the past 100 years or so, has shaped our understanding of intergroup relations. In the process, we will trace the research tradition from the current day research frontier back to its historical roots, and place this pivotal research in context. Apart from a few lectures, the course consists of seminars prepared through the writing of short memos. The course builds on active participation and engagement in discussions based on the course literature, documentary films and simulations.

Instruction

Seminar-based with active participation based on students’ written memos
Simulations
Lectures

Assessment

  • Several short written assignments in which students are asked to reflect upon and raise questions in response to the readings.
  • Participation in seminars and simulations.
  • Grades: Pass with distinction (VG), Pass (G), Fail (U).
  • Two retake opportunities are offered every year the course is given.

Reading list

The reading list is missing. For further information, please contact the responsible department.