Master’s studies

Syllabus for Development Studies B: Intermediate Course

Utvecklingsstudier B

A later update of this course syllabus has been published.

Syllabus

  • 30 credits
  • Course code: 2SK031
  • Education cycle: First cycle
  • Main field(s) of study and in-depth level: Development Studies G1F
  • Grading system: Fail (U), Pass (G), Pass with distinction (VG).
  • Established: 2007-01-24
  • Established by: The Faculty Board of Social Sciences
  • Revised: 2016-05-18
  • Revised by: The Department Board
  • Applies from: week 34, 2016
  • Entry requirements: Development Studies A or equivalent
  • Responsible department: Department of Government

Learning outcomes

On completion of the course the student is expected to

  • with some degree of competence discuss and work with development research problems
  • have formed a considered judgement of his own in both theoretical and empirical questions concerning the democratic rule and, in this respect, be able to analyse and discuss ideas and empirical research findings about democracy at a fairly advanced level
  • discuss the choice of method and design (case studies, comparative method, idea analysis) in a problem perspective
  • actively participate in seminar discussions and make presentations of articles and of his own work.

Content

The course is divided into three parts.

The first sub-course deals with the problems of democracy. Normative questions concerning the concept of democracy, arguments for and against democracy, the relationship between democracy, constitutionalism and efficiency, and the relationship between democracy and feminism, are brought up here. In the second part mainly empirical questions about the prerequisites for democracy as well as its spread, causes and effects are treated.

The second part of the course offers a choice between three sub-courses, where some are given during the fall semester and others during the spring semester. During the fall semester we offer the following courses: Development Theory and Colonial Legacies, International Politics or Gender, Power and Institutions. During the spring semester we offer the following courses: Comparative Politics, International Politics or Environmental Politics and its Challenges.

The third sub-part offers basic knowledge in scientific method. The students get a first introduction to empirical research and to the way in which different choices of method affect the realisation and results of a research project. The focus of the course is on basic methodological concepts and qualitative methods.

1. Problems of Democracy 7.5 credits

Learning outcomes
The course introduces some fundamental problems of democracy from a political science perspective. The aim is to equip students with the ability to independently analyse the central theoretical and empirical questions regarding democratic government. The course builds on themes introduced during Political Science A, within the fields of Political Theory and Comparative Politics.

The ambition is to equip students with the ability to discuss ideas about democracy as well as empirical research at a fairly advanced level. In practice, this means that the students - aided by the course topics described below - make the leap from arguing from a limited and personal point of view, to constructing more general, systematic and well-founded arguments. More precisely, at the end of the course the students should:

  • be able to describe and compare various conceptions of democracy.
  • be able to mention and evaluate the historically most important arguments for and against democracy.
  • know, and be able to employ and critically review some of the most common explanations of democratisation.
  • know how democracy in general, and its constitutional structure in particular, affects various political and economic outcomes.
  • be able to argue for or against ideas and theses in a systematic and well-founded manner, orally as well as in writing.

Content
The course consists of two parts:

The first part deals with normative democratic theory. It covers conceptual issues concerning the meaning of democracy, normative questions about the justification of democracy, and the problems and solutions that have been offered within different traditions in democratic theory. We cover issues such as: What are the main problems within democratic theory? What solutions have been suggested? How do we define democracy? What is good about democracy? What is the significance of granting various interests and groups political representation? Should the ideals of democracy be reformulated in the light of contemporary forms of globalisation?

The second part of the course deals with the political and economic preconditions and consequences of democracy: Why are some countries more democratic than others? What are the conditions for establishing global democracy? Does democracy matter for welfare? What are the distributive consequences? The constitutional design of democracies is also emphasised: What impact does it have on political and economic outcomes?

Teaching
This course consists of lectures and seminars. Attendance at all seminars is mandatory, while attendance at lectures is voluntary. The course is divided into three parts. Course lectures aim to introduce the main points covered in each part. The seminars aim to develop the students’ analytical skills through discussion in smaller groups. Before each seminar, all students will be required to prepare answers to a set of questions, individually and/or in groups. These prepared answers will be discussed during the seminars. This way, the seminars should provide opportunities for the students to continuously reflect on the content of the course, and work together to highlight the practical importance of theoretical ideas that are introduced throughout the course.

Examination
The course ends with an exam, which serves both as basis for grading, and an opportunity for the student to rehearse the content of the course.

The grading system is VG Pass with distinction’, G Pass’ and U Fail’.

To pass’ the class, the student is required to
  • participate actively in the seminars and get a pass on the assignments
  • pass’ the final exam

2. Gender, Power and Institutions 7.5 credits

The course is offered during the autumn semester resources permitting

Content

The course addresses questions, both theoretically and empirically, of how gender inequality arises, is maintained and managed, within both formal institutions (e.g. parliaments, parties and organisations) and informal institutions (e.g. networks, norms and ideas). The course is grounded in the new institutionalist theories which have, in recent years, become very influential in the field of political science. In the theoretical part of the course, the students are introduced to basic concepts and theories about gender, power and institutions. The empirical parts of the course give students concrete examples of how these concepts and theories can be used to analyse politics and policy from a gender perspective. For instance, how different kinds of institution interact resulting in gendered consequences in political representation, public politics and policy will be discussed.

Learning outcomes
The course aims to furnish students with the knowledge of how to analyse political processes and policy from a gendered, new institutionalist perspective.

After completion of the course, the students are expected to:

  • On the basis of theories introduced during the course, be able to account for and critically discuss the concepts of gender and power
  • Be able to account for the difference between formal and informal institutions
  • Be able to give examples of and describe empirical gender research within the field of new institutionalism
  • Be able to analyse political phenomena from a gendered, new institutionalist perspective
Teaching
The teaching consists of lectures and seminars. The seminars are compulsory, and there is an assignment that has to be completed in advance of each seminar. The participants are also expected to undertake independent study of the course literature, preferably before the corresponding lectures, and certainly before the seminars. The total time of study should be around 40 hours per week. The course language is English.

Examination
Examination takes place continuously throughout the course, through written and oral assignments, as well as through active participation in the seminars. At the end of the course, the students write a final course paper which will be discussed during a seminar and examined by the teacher. The course paper must deal with issues addressed during the course. The following grades will be applied: pass with distinction (VG), pass (G) and fail (U).
In order to pass the following is required:
  • The student has achieved the learning outcomes
  • The student has participated in all compulsory elements of the course
  • All the assignments have been completed and passed
  • The course paper has been handed in before the deadline and passed

5. Development Theory and Colonial Legacies 7.5 credits

The course is offered during the autumn semester resources permitting

Objectives

After the course, the students are expected to be able to

  • account for main trends in how perceptions of development have changed over time in colonial and post-colonial Africa, Latin America and South Asia since 1800
  • account for examples of how colonial policies in Africa, Latin America and South Asia have been formed in relation to perceived insufficiencies obstructing development
  • analyse how perceptions of similarity and difference between groups of people influence development policies
  • account for examples of how perceptions of nationality, ethnicity, race and gender been integrated parts of development perceptions
  • account for how development and underdevelopment theories been worked out in relation to colonial and post-colonial experiences in Africa, Latin America, South Asia and Europe.

Content of the course
The course contains an analysis of perceptions and theories of “development” and “progress” and how these perceptions have influenced the political, economic and social practices in South Asia, Africa and Latin America since about 1800. The course deals with changes in the perceptions of development caused by colonial and post-colonial experiences. Further, the course deals with perceptions of race and ethnicity, of sex/gender and of how social power was organised politically as integrated parts of perceptions of development. The course is given by teachers from different disciplines to illustrate different perspectives on issues of development in history.

Teaching
The instructions consist of lectures and seminars.

Examination
Examination is given through a written exam. One part of the exam might be examined by written assignments and active participation in seminars. In order to pass the course the students need to pass the written exam. Grades are awarded according the scale “failed”, "pass" or "pass with distinction".

Further instructions
Further instructions will be given at the start of the course.

6. International Politics 7.5 credits

The course is offered during the autumn and spring semester resources permitting

Course content

This course provides students with a deeper introduction to the conceptual and theoretical tools used in the study of international politics. The course also examines a number of enduring and contemporary topics in international relations, such as international cooperation, security issues, nuclear proliferation, arms control, environmental politics, foreign policy analysis, warning-response problems and humanitarian intervention. The course concludes with a role-playing game where students have the opportunity to apply the concepts they have learned by engaging in simulated international negotiations.

Goals
The overarching goal of this course is to impart how the fundamental concepts, theoretical approaches, and methods from International Relations and social science can be applied to make sense of and study world politics and global affairs. The course also aims to help students develop a set of general skills - the ability to think critically, analyse information, and express themselves orally and in writing - that will serve them well in their future educational and professional endeavours. Upon completion of this course students should be able to able to deploy key theoretical concepts from the main schools of thought in the field to analyse global issues and assess and evaluate various policy prescriptions designed to address transnational problems.

This class serves as the intermediate level course within the sub-discipline of International Politics. The completion of this course with a passing grade should serve as useful preparation for the MA course in International Politics course. The intent is also to provide a good foundation for students who want to pursue this topic in a C level essay.

Instruction
The instruction of this course is comprised of a combination of lectures and seminars. The course also includes a simulation (role-playing) exercise.

The literature includes books, articles and working material.

The language of instruction for this course is English.


Examination

  • Mandatory attendance and active participation in the seminars and simulation exercise.
  • Written assignments.
  • Written Test (Final examination).

Examination is based upon participation in compulsory elements of the course and a written exam. The following grades will be applied: passed with distinction (VG), passed (G) and failed (U).

In order to pass the following is required:

(1) The completion of compulsory elements of the course (seminars, simulation, written assignments);
(2) A passing grade on the written exam.

To pass the course with distinction the student is required to participate in compulsory elements of the course as well as receiving a grade of ‘passed with distinction’ on the written exam.

7. Methods 15.0 credits

Course aims
The purpose of the course is to give the students a theoretical understanding of the basic concepts in social science research and methodological choices, and be able to apply this. The focus of the course is on qualitative methods as they are used in Political science and Development Studies. After completion of the course, students are expected to have acquired the following abilities:

  • To formulate a research question relevant for political science or development studies
  • To connect a research question to relevant previous research
  • To understand the how to define and operationalise concepts
  • To have a basic knowledge of methods in the analysis of ideas, normative analysis, and process tracing
  • To have a basic knowledge about data collection and analysis based on texts, questionnaires, focus groups, experiments, and observation
  • To have a basic understanding of how to design a study in political science or development studies

Course content
The course is on methods in social science, with a focus on qualitative methods. Its core idea is that scientific method is best understood when applied. Therefore each part in the course will be applied in exercises by the students. The knowledge and understanding gained this way will also facilitate the students’ critical review of previous research.

The course emphasises the pivotal role for research and investigations of a clear and well formulated question. The question should steer the study and the methodological choices made by the author. The course will focus on several qualitative methods: analysis of ideas, normative critique and argumentation, and process tracing. The students will also acquaint themselves with different kinds of data material – from texts, interviews, focus groups, experiments, and observations. In the last part and exercise in the course the student shall make an appropriate design of a study based on her/his own research question. The aim in the last part is thus also to tie the different parts of the course together. By training the students systematically in the different core components of a scientific study the course’s aim is also to prepare the students well for their BA thesis.

The training of these skills will be continuously examined during the course. The idea is to give the students opportunities to exercise in a rather concrete way the different components in social science research, and in this way to make it possible to deepen their understanding. Active participation, critical discussions, and feedback from the teacher in the seminars will enhance learning.

Teaching
The course will be introduced by lectures on the research process. Then each part of the course consists of lectures and a seminar when the students’ papers will be discussed.

The language of teaching is Swedish.

Examination
The course is examined by means of a written exam in the beginning of the course plus the seminar papers. Grades are awarded according to the scale “failed”, “pass” or “pass with distinction”. Examination is based on the written seminar assignment as well as on active participation in the seminars. For the grade “pass” it is required that the student will have handed in all assignments, acquired the grade “pass” and actively participated in all the seminars, and acquired “pass” in the written exam.
 

8. Comparative Politics 7.5 credits

The course is offered during the spring semester resources permitting

Learning Outcomes
The course aims at providing a good understanding of research in the field of comparative politics. It should provide good knowledge of important research contributions and research strategies that aim at, or are useful for, describing and explaining political and ethnic conflicts, tolerance, socialisation, democratisation and development, in an extensive geographical comparative context, in developed as well as developing parts of the world. Also, the choice of literature and the cases selected to be studied have been made to give examples of different designs of research projects that should be useful for students preparing their C/master-level thesis project. In short, after the course, the students should:

  • have a good idea of what comparative politics is
  • understand when and why different groups enter into conflicts, how groups are mobilized, and why they sometimes manage to establish peaceful coexistence, and even manage to build democratic systems
  • know the comparative politics discourse better
  • be better prepared to write a thesis

Content
Comparative politics is a strange name for a field of research. It is strange because what you find under the label comparative politics – and its synonyms in other languages – often is not (explicitly) comparative. Most of the time it simply is “politics in some country/countries”. The conventional distinction between comparative and international politics is that the former deals with politics in other countries, and the latter between countries; this is easier to remember if one thinks of another common name for the latter – international relations.

If comparative politics is politics in other countries, then it is indeed a lot. Therefore we must make choices of what to study. One option would be to attempt to classify the world’s political systems in a number of fairly distinct categories, and to learn about these categories and their cases. This has been attempted by numerous authors. Another choice is to study a number of constitutional systems in the world. This course is built on another kind of logic. We have chosen to focus on some central research problems in comparative politics.

The overall problems concern democracy, conflicts, institutions (rules), tolerance, justice and development. These are chosen because important parts of research in political science concern these issues, and secondly because these issues are important to many people in many countries; two overriding criteria for any research or teaching in social science. The course is divided into four themes:
  • Ethnic conflicts, tolerance and democracy
  • Challenges in multicultural societies
  • Political activism
  • Classics of comparative politics
The choice of theme(s) and literature is a conscious attempt to bridge the unfortunate divide between studies of the West and “the rest”. The idea is that we can learn more about industrialised countries, former socialist countries and so-called low- or middle income countries not by separating them, but by studying them together.

Apart from the books required to be read, the course will make use of some academic articles. One purpose of using these articles is to give the students an idea about current debates in international research. All articles will be available for free via the Uppsala University Library.

The students are encouraged to participate actively in the discussions. We have achieved our objective with this course if, in at the end of it, the students think they have a better (or even much better) grasp of some substantial empirical, or political, problems in the contemporary world and some orientation in a few current debates in international research in general and comparative politics in particular.

Instruction
The instruction of this course is comprised of a combination of lectures and seminars. The language of instruction is English. The written assignment (classic review) should be written in English (so everyone can read and comment on the proposal/text). Regarding the written exam, students may give answers in English or Swedish. They may use a language dictionary at the exam.

Attendance is compulsory for all seminars. If students fail to attend a seminar they will have to hand in an extra written assignment. Additional instructions for the seminars may be handed out by the lecturers.

Assessment
The requirements of the course are:
  • Attendance at some lectures
  • Attendance and active participation in the seminars.
  • Writing a review of a classic in comparative politics
  • Written exam

The grade
Participation in the seminars is only graded as “pass” or “fail.” If the students come to the seminars and actively participate in the debates, and if they have done their best to absorb the literature before the seminar, then it is very likely that they will pass.

One grade for the whole course will be given according to the Swedish three-level system: Pass with distinction= Väl godkänd (Vg), Pass = Godkänd (G), and Fail = Underkänd (U).
  • The book report for the “Classics” will be graded. The students need at least a 50% score to pass, and at least 75% to pass with distinction. The grade for the “Classics”-assignment constitutes 20% of the final grade.
  • The exam will be graded. The students need at least 50% to pass, and at least 75% to pass with distinction. The grade for the exam constitutes 80% of the final grade.


 

11. Environmental Politics and Its Challenges 7.5 credits

The course is offered during the spring semester resources permitting

Content

The course consists of three parts:

(1) Collective action problems and environmental challenges in developing and developed countries; (2) Energy and technology; (3) Regional and international efforts to address climate change.

Goals
The course has two overarching goals. The first is to deepen the students’ knowledge and understanding of the ‘collective action dilemma’ from a social science perspective. The second goal is to acquaint the students with two important, and interdependent, global problems: climate change and energy. As a corollary to these two goals the course will also analyse and discuss possible political solutions to the management of climate and energy issues (as well as dilemmas over natural resources more generally). To this end, the course will examine possible solutions at the local, regional, and international levels.

At the global and the regional level, emphasis will be placed on international cooperation on climate change and the European Union’s role in the struggle to combat climate change. At the local level, the course will focus on how energy and climate politics are played out in developing countries.

Upon the completion of this course the students are expected to thoroughly understand the interface between politics and the challenge of addressing environmental problems and managing limited natural resources. The intent is also to provide a good foundation for students who want to pursue this topic in a C level essay in Development studies or Political Science.

Teaching
The course is composed of a mixture of lectures and seminars. The lectures address the basic themes and issues. During the seminar students get the opportunity to discuss questions linked to the basic themes.

The literature includes articles and working material.

The course is taught in English.

Examination
Examination is based upon participation in compulsory elements of the course and a written exam. The following grades will be applied: passed with distinction (VG), passed (G) and failed (U).

In order to pass the following is required:

(1) Active participation during compulsory elements of the course (seminars);
(2) A passing grade on the written exam.

To pass the course with distinction the student is required to participate in compulsory elements of the course as well as receiving a grade of ‘passed with distinction’ on the written exam.

Instruction

The instruction is done in the form of lectures and seminars of varying content and disposition.

Additional information regarding instruction and examination will be handed out before each sub-course.

Assessment

The course is examined by means of course papers, exams, assignments, and active participation in the seminars. Grades are awarded according the scale “failed”, "pass" or "pass with distinction".

Reading list

Applies from: week 35, 2016

Problems of Democracy

  • Oskarsson, Sven; Widmalm, Sten Myt eller verklighet : om samband mellan demokrati och ekonomisk tillväxt

    Stockholm: Norstedt, 2010

    Find in the library

    Mandatory

  • Dahl, Robert A. Democracy and its critics

    New Haven: Yale Univ. Press, cop. 1989

    Find in the library

    Mandatory

Articles will be added

Gender, Power and Institutions

Kursen ges höstterminen 2016

  • Mackay, Fiona.; Krook, Mona Lena. Gender, politics and institutions : towards a feminist institutionalism

    Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2011

    Find in the library

    Mandatory

  • Brantenberg, Gerd Egalia's daughters : a satire of the sexes

    Emeryville, CA: Seal Press, 2004

    Find in the library

    Mandatory

Articles will be added

Development Theory and Colonial Legacies

Kursen ges höstterminen 2016

  • Cooper, Frederick Africa since 1940 : the past of the present

    Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002

    Find in the library

    Mandatory

  • Eriksson Baaz, Maria The paternalism of partnership : a postcolonial reading of identity in development aid

    New York ; London: Zed Books, cop. 2005

    Find in the library

    Mandatory

  • Larson, Brooke. Trials of nation making : liberalism, race, and ethnicity in the Andes, 1810-1910

    New York: Cambridge University Press, 2004

    Find in the library

    Mandatory

  • Johnson, Gordon; Metcalf, Thomas R. The new Cambridge history of India. : 3 [The Indian empire and the beginnings of modern society], 4 Ideologies of the Raj

    Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1996

    Find in the library

    Mandatory

  • Osterhammel, Jürgen Colonialism : a theoretical overview

    2nd Markus Wiener Publishers ed.: Princeton, NJ: Markus Wiener Publishers, 2004.

    Find in the library

    Mandatory

  • Washbrook, David India 1818-1860: The Two Faces of Colonialism

    Part of:

    Louis, William Roger; Low, Alaine; Porter, Andrew The Oxford history of the British Empire. : Vol. 3 The nineteenth century

    Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1999

    vol. 3 (1999) s. 395-421

    Find in the library

    Mandatory

Articles will be added

International Politics

  • Reus-Smit, Christian; Snidal, Duncan The Oxford handbook of international relations

    Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2010

    paperback edition

    Find in the library

    Mandatory

  • Betts, Richard K. The Delusion of Impartial Intervention

    Part of:

    Crocker, Chester A.; Hampson, Fen Osler; Aall, Pamela R. Turbulent peace : the challenges of managing international conflict.

    Washington, D.C.: United States Institute of Peace Press, 2001

    s. 285-294

    Find in the library

    Mandatory

Articles will be added

Methods

  • Beckman, Ludvig Grundbok i idéanalys : det kritiska studiet av politiska texter och idéer

    Stockholm: Santérus, 2005

    Find in the library

    Mandatory

  • Metodpraktikan : Konsten att studera samhälle, individ och marknad Esaiasson, Peter; Gilljam, Mikael; Oscarsson, Henrik; Wängnerud, Lena

    4. uppl.: Norstedts Juridik AB, 2012

    Find in the library

    Mandatory

  • Teorell, Jan; Svensson, Torsten Att fråga och att svara : samhällsvetenskaplig metod

    1. uppl.: Stockholm: Liber, 2007

    s.21-31 samt 247-261

    Find in the library

    Mandatory

Articles and course material will be added

Comparative Politics

Kursen ges vårterminen 2017 Disclaimer: the course will be given according to the proposed outline given that there will be enough teachers available to teach in the course.

  • Buruma, Ian Murder in Amsterdam : the death of Theo van Gogh and the limits of tolerance

    Pbk ed.: London: Atlantic Books, 2006

    Find in the library

    Mandatory

  • Tarrow, Sidney G. Power in movement : social movements and contentious politics

    Rev. & updated 3rd ed.: Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2011

    Find in the library

    Mandatory

  • Widmalm, Sten Political tolerance in the global south : images of India, Pakistan and Uganda

    London: Routledge, 2016.

    Find in the library

    Mandatory

Articles and some comparative classics will be added

Environmental Politics and Its Challenges

Kursen ges vårterminen 2017

The course readings comprise of a number of scientific articles.