Syllabus for Mechanics Basic Course

Mekanik baskurs

Syllabus

  • 10 credits
  • Course code: 1FA105
  • Education cycle: First cycle
  • Main field(s) of study and in-depth level: Physics G1F, Technology G1F

    Explanation of codes

    The code indicates the education cycle and in-depth level of the course in relation to other courses within the same main field of study according to the requirements for general degrees:

    First cycle
    G1N: has only upper-secondary level entry requirements
    G1F: has less than 60 credits in first-cycle course/s as entry requirements
    G1E: contains specially designed degree project for Higher Education Diploma
    G2F: has at least 60 credits in first-cycle course/s as entry requirements
    G2E: has at least 60 credits in first-cycle course/s as entry requirements, contains degree project for Bachelor of Arts/Bachelor of Science
    GXX: in-depth level of the course cannot be classified.

    Second cycle
    A1N: has only first-cycle course/s as entry requirements
    A1F: has second-cycle course/s as entry requirements
    A1E: contains degree project for Master of Arts/Master of Science (60 credits)
    A2E: contains degree project for Master of Arts/Master of Science (120 credits)
    AXX: in-depth level of the course cannot be classified.

  • Grading system: Fail (U), Pass (3), Pass with credit (4), Pass with distinction (5)
  • Established: 2008-05-13
  • Established by:
  • Revised: 2019-02-13
  • Revised by: The Faculty Board of Science and Technology
  • Applies from: week 27, 2019
  • Entry requirements: Algebra and Geometry or equivalent.
  • Responsible department: Department of Physics and Astronomy

Learning outcomes

On completion of the course the student shall be able to:

  • use vector algebra in three dimensions in different bases, length, addition and multiplication of vectors, inner product, cross product, for calculations in mechanics.
  • use properties of the inner product and the cross product, geometric and physical interpretations, differentiation of vector functions, differentiation of coordinates and basis vectors in different coordinate systems, for calculations in mechanics.
  • use vectors to describe geometric quantities as curves, area and volume elements, as well as physical quantities as velocity, acceleration, force and torque.
  • describe and explain fundamental quantities in kinematics and dynamics of particles and particle systems in inertial and non-inertial systems.
  • explain and use the theory of classical mechanics, consisting of relations between the fundamental quantities based on Newton's laws, in simple given examples.
  • apply the fundamental quantities and the theory of classical mechanics by analysing physical processes and construct mathematical models for statics and dynamics of objects.
  • show analytical problem solving skills for mechanical and engineering applications and account for relevant approximations.
  • carry out physical experiments and present, explain and defend the results.

Content

Geometry, trigonometry and vector algebra: vector algebra in three dimensions using different bases, length, addition and multiplication of vectors, inner product and cross product. The properties of the inner product and the vector product, geometric and physical interpretations, rules of differentiation for vector functions, differentiation of coordinates and basis vectors in different coordinate systems. Curves, area elements, volume elements.
Applications of statics and geometry: force, torque.
The kinematics of particles in different coordinate systems, cartesian-, normal and tangential- as well as polar coordinates.
The dynamics of particles: force, linear momentum, impulse, torque, angular momentum, angular impulse, Newton's laws.
Particle systems, center of mass, Euler's law for the movement of the the center of mass. Mass flows, the rocket equation.
Work and energy. Energy relations. Gradient.
Accelerated reference frames.
The development of the mechanics. Kepler's laws. Short introduction to oscillatory motion.
Models for the motion of objects with applications.
Experimental work, laboratory exercises, oral and written reports.

Instruction

Lectures, exercise classes, group work and laboratory exercises. Guest lecture or study visit.

Assessment

Written examination at the end of the course as well as optional written continuous examination that can substitute parts of examination (9 credits). Laboratory exercises with oral and written presentations (1 credit).

If there are special reasons for doing so, an examiner may make an exception from the method of assessment indicated and allow a student to be assessed by another method. An example of special reasons might be a certificate regarding special pedagogical support from the disability coordinator of the university.

Other directives

The course may not be included in a degree together with one of the courses Mechanics I 1FA101 or Mechanics 1FA104.

Reading list

Reading list

Applies from: week 20, 2019

  • Bedford, Anthony; Fowler, Wallace L.; Ahmad, Yusof. Engineering mechanics. : Dynamics

    5th ed. in SI units.: Singapore: Prentice Hall, 2008

    Find in the library

    Mandatory

  • Morin, David Problems and Solutions in Introductory Mechanics

    Harvard University, 2014

  • Nordling, Carl; Österman, Jonny Physics handbook for science and engineering

    8., [rev.] ed.: Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2006

    Find in the library

    Mandatory