Syllabus for Databases 2

Databaser 2

  • 7.5 credits
  • Course code: 2IS227
  • Education cycle: First cycle
  • Main field(s) of study and in-depth level: Information Systems G1F

    Explanation of codes

    The code indicates the education cycle and in-depth level of the course in relation to other courses within the same main field of study according to the requirements for general degrees:

    First cycle

    • G1N: has only upper-secondary level entry requirements
    • G1F: has less than 60 credits in first-cycle course/s as entry requirements
    • G1E: contains specially designed degree project for Higher Education Diploma
    • G2F: has at least 60 credits in first-cycle course/s as entry requirements
    • G2E: has at least 60 credits in first-cycle course/s as entry requirements, contains degree project for Bachelor of Arts/Bachelor of Science
    • GXX: in-depth level of the course cannot be classified

    Second cycle

    • A1N: has only first-cycle course/s as entry requirements
    • A1F: has second-cycle course/s as entry requirements
    • A1E: contains degree project for Master of Arts/Master of Science (60 credits)
    • A2E: contains degree project for Master of Arts/Master of Science (120 credits)
    • AXX: in-depth level of the course cannot be classified

  • Grading system: Fail (U), Pass (G), Pass with distinction (VG)
  • Established: 2017-05-18
  • Established by:
  • Revised: 2022-05-19
  • Revised by: The Department Board
  • Applies from: Spring 2023
  • Entry requirements: 30 credits in information systems or the equivalent including 7.5 credits in databases
  • Responsible department: Department of Informatics and Media

Learning outcomes

Regarding knowledge and understanding the student is expected to be able to on completion of the course:

  • summarize how NoSQL databases work,
  • describe central concepts in Big Data.
Regarding competence and skills the student is expected to be able to on completion of the course:
  • apply advanced techniques in relational databases, such as indexes, views, triggers, cursors, and stored procedures,
  • design and manage NoSQL databases,
  • implement database transaction management.
Regarding judgement and approach the student is expected to be able to on completion of the course:
  • evaluate database implementations in a given context
  • reflect on how the use of databases and data storage can affect an individual, organisation, and society from an ethical perspective.

Content

The course provides an in-depth study of relational databases where transaction management and multi-user systems are treated. The course also includes in-depth study of SQL with exercises in working with views, indexes, triggers and stored procedures. Furthermore, different types of NoSQL databases are studied with a focus on their use in applications and their functionality. The course also addresses the concept of Big Data and areas of use for different types of databases. The course also deals with ethical aspects of how the design and use of various forms of databases and data storage affect individuals, organizations and society.

Instruction

The course is given in the form of lectures, seminars, and labs.

Assessment

The course is examined through seminars and assignments.

If there are special reasons for doing so, an examiner may make an exception from the method of assessment indicated and allow a student to be assessed by another method. An example of special reasons might be a certificate regarding special pedagogical support from the University's disability coordinator or a decision by the department's working group for study matters.

Reading list

The reading list is missing. For further information, please contact the responsible department.