Syllabus for Development Studies B

Utvecklingsstudier B

A revised version of the syllabus is available.

Syllabus

  • 30 credits
  • Course code: 2SK031
  • Education cycle: First cycle
  • Main field(s) of study and in-depth level: Development Studies G1F

    Explanation of codes

    The code indicates the education cycle and in-depth level of the course in relation to other courses within the same main field of study according to the requirements for general degrees:

    First cycle

    • G1N: has only upper-secondary level entry requirements
    • G1F: has less than 60 credits in first-cycle course/s as entry requirements
    • G1E: contains specially designed degree project for Higher Education Diploma
    • G2F: has at least 60 credits in first-cycle course/s as entry requirements
    • G2E: has at least 60 credits in first-cycle course/s as entry requirements, contains degree project for Bachelor of Arts/Bachelor of Science
    • GXX: in-depth level of the course cannot be classified

    Second cycle

    • A1N: has only first-cycle course/s as entry requirements
    • A1F: has second-cycle course/s as entry requirements
    • A1E: contains degree project for Master of Arts/Master of Science (60 credits)
    • A2E: contains degree project for Master of Arts/Master of Science (120 credits)
    • AXX: in-depth level of the course cannot be classified

  • Grading system: Fail (U), Pass (G), Pass with distinction (VG)
  • Established: 2007-01-24
  • Established by: The Faculty Board of Social Sciences
  • Revised: 2011-05-11
  • Revised by: The Board of the Department of Government
  • Applies from: week 35, 2011
  • Entry requirements: Development Studies basic level or equivalent education.
  • Responsible department: Department of Government

Learning outcomes

After completion of Development Studies B the students are expected to:
- have deepened their empirical, theoretical, and methodological knowledge and skill within the field, especially regarding:
- the impact of colonialism on development theories and developing countries
- anthropological perspectives on globalisation and the Third World
- be familiar with the most important contributions within the social movement field and gained a good grasp over the debate
- through practical assignments get first hand experience of all different methods and types of information used in development research
- independently formulate a researchable hypothesis or theory built on previous research in development

Content

1. Development Theory and Colonial Legacies 7.5 hp

Learning outcomes After the course, the students are expected to be able to - account for main trends in how perceptions of development have changed over time in colonial and post-colonial Africa, Latin America and South Asia since 1800 - account for examples of how colonial policies in Africa, Latin America and South Asia have been formed in relation to perceived insufficiencies obstructing development - analyse how perceptions of similarity and difference between groups of people influence development policies - account for examples of how perceptions of nationality, ethnicity, race and gender been integrated parts of development perceptions - account for how development and underdevelopment theories been worked out in relation to colonial and post-colonial experiences in Africa, Latin America, South Asia and Europe. Content of the course The course contains an analysis of perceptions and theories of "development" and "progress" and how these perceptions have influenced the political, economic and social practices in South Asia, Africa and Latin America since about 1800. The course deals with changes in the perceptions of development caused by colonial and post-colonial experiences. Further, the course deals with perceptions of race and ethnicity, of sex/gender and of how social power was organised politically as integrated parts of perceptions of development. The course is given by teachers from different disciplines to illustrate different perspectives on issues of development in history. Teaching The instructions consist of lectures and seminars. Examination Examination is given through a written exam. One part of the exam might be examined by written assignments and active participation in seminars. In order to pass the course the students need to pass the written exam. Grades are awarded according the scale "failed", "pass" or "pass with distinction". The written test will include four questions (one for each seminar) for students who have not participated in one or more seminars, or who have not submitted the written assignments. Those who have fulfilled the seminar requirements do not have to answer these questions and can count in points for each question. Specialisation in relation to examination requirements The course provides the students with the opportunity to practice independent evaluation and critical treatment of development theories by relating these theories both to their epistemological context and to the historical contexts within which they were worked out. Further instructions A prerequisite for successful studies is the active participation in seminars and lectures, and the continuous reading of the course literature.

2. Social movements and political change in developing countries 5.5 hp

Learning outcomes After completion of the course, students are expected to have acquired the following: - be able to understand, summarise, and critically analyse a few central contributions in the literature on social movements - be familiar with different types of social movements in developing countries - analyse how social movements in developing countries differ from, or are similar to, social movements in developed countries, and thereby be able to identify new important and interesting research questions within the field Content of the course Social movements is today an important channel to influence politics through participation, and some scholars are talking about a 'social movement society' because of its institutionalisation. The literature on social movements is to a large extent based on movements in the West (U.S in particular and, to some degree, Europe) and therefore also on movements in developed countries and democracies. Different types of social movements are however widespread also in Latin America, Asia, the Middle East and Africa, and have informed theoretical discussions. By including the experiences and analysis from countries in the South, and thereby also developing countries and authoritarian regimes, there are large potential for theory development within the field. This course aims to understand and analyse social movements in developing countries through different perspectives. We discuss, among other things, identity formation within different movements, how different groups chose to frame their claims, the political context and the political opportunities within systems, and if political protests lead anywhere. The global discourse on human rights has influenced how local groups around the world chose to frame their demands for change. Transnational networks between movements play an increasing role: international organisations (often with headquarters in the North) can influence national governments (often in the South) to give in to demands which local groups could not have pressed on their own. What do social movements mean for politics in developing countries? Can protests initiate political change? Can marginalised groups influence policy-making? Many groups protest against the neo-liberal model that has been dominant in the past decades while at the same time they adopt a rights perspective, which can be seen as part of the neo-liberal model, and herein lies a paradox. This paradox will be a main theme throughout the course. One question we pose is whether the focus on identity politics, and the right to be different with regard to ethnicity, gender or sex in the past decades overshadow, and even undermine, previous demands for redistribution of resources. Teaching The teaching consists of lectures and seminars. Examination Examination will be through a written home exam. Preparations before, and active participation in seminars is required. Grades are awarded according to the scale "failed", "pass" or "pass with distinction".

3. Power to the People! Supporting Decentralisation and Dev. 5.5 hp

learning outcomes After completion of the course, students are expected to have acquired the following abilities: - Summarise the main components of a decentralisation reform - Analyse and present the main priorities of Swedish development cooperation policy for democracy and human rights - Formulate and present a research task in response to a request for knowledge assistance by a development cooperation agency – formulated in a Terms of Reference – within the area of democracy and development - To critically examine a (consultancy-)report from a research- and development cooperation perspective - Understand the main components of a development cooperation agency's process for the formulation of concrete support modalities Content of the course Swedish Development cooperation policy puts a strong emphasis on the importance of democracy and human rights as preconditions for the empowerment of poor people. At the same time, more and more countries choose to increase and empower local decision-making institutions and local development processes within for example health and education. This course aims to deepen students' knowledge and understanding of development cooperation work and how research can contribute and improve support to democracy and development. The course will in detail follow the process of designing support to the ongoing decentralisation process in Tanzania – with Swedish policy and Partner country priorities as the points of departure. The teaching will be designed around Sida's process for arriving at concrete support modalities to partner countries. The students will formulate a research design in response to a Sida Terms of Reference for knowledge support, present a consultancy report and outline the content of a support to Tanzania's decentralisation reform – thus providing the students with a good insight of opportunities and challenges of development cooperation in practise. Teaching The course consists of lectures on local democracy and development, development policy and processes of development cooperation. The seminars will follow a concrete aid process from the input from research and knowledge production to implementation of support programmes. Representatives of aid and consultancy organisations in the development cooperation area will participate in the teaching and a study-visit to a Swedish organisation or agency that works specifically with the development cooperation is part of the compulsory elements of the course. Examination Examination of this course is through group seminar assignments, active participation during seminars and through a written exam. Grades are awarded according to the scale "failed", "pass" or "pass with distinction". Examination is based on the written seminar assignment as well as on active participation in the seminars and the written exam. For the grade "pass" it is required that the student will have handed in all assignments and acquired the grade "pass", actively participated in all the seminars and achieved the grade "pass" on the written exam.

4. Research in politics and development 11.5 hp

Learning outcomes After completion of the course, students are expected to have acquired the following abilities: - to critically examine scholarly research from a methodological perspective which includes among other things: basic knowledge about the research process, what is required to establish causality and different criteria of solid research such as validity, reliability and generalisation - to formulate and motivate their own research questions, to make a research design that help answer the research questions, and to discuss relevant problems of methodology in their study - to conduct empirical investigations on their own and discuss relevant problems of methodology in data collection - to improve their abilities during the process of the course - and formulate a researchable study Content of the course This is a course about scientific methods, with a focus on qualitative methods, and it provide students with the tools they need to write academic papers. The underlying idea is that scientific method is best understood through application, and designing our own study is an effective way of learning about relevant methodological problems and the different ways of solving them. This also provides the students with the proper methodological tools for analysing academic research in general. We emphasise the importance of posing new and interesting research questions, and students are reminded of the central role of the research question throughout the course. The research question shall guide the choices we have to make in the research process. The focus is on qualitative methods and students practice making their own research design to answer the research question. They will also try out different types of data collection, such as interviews, surveys, focus groups, and direct observation. Some seminar assignments are especially relevant for students of development studies, such as participatory methods which apply a bottom-up perspective and are commonly used in development cooperation. For this course, student will not write a full academic paper but will instead practice on different parts of any research project and academic product. For the last assignment, students write a dissertation memorandum where all parts of the research process are put together into a whole: in the dissertation memo students therefore formulate a research question, make a research design, analyse the empirical data at hand, and suggest possible results of the study. With the different parts put together in the dissertation memo, we are in a better position to discuss how well the research question fits with the other parts, and to discuss the relevant method problems when we have an indication of the results. One of the course aims is that students are to improve their abilities during the process of the course, and this is also a basis for examination. The idea is that students through concrete application of the various steps of the research process will deepen their learning and understanding of academic research. Students will receive comments and feedback from the instructor and participating students during the seminar assignments that will assist the student to either overcome methodological challenges or to discuss remaining problems in an insightful way in the final dissertation memo so that a manageable research task is formulated. Teaching The course begins with introductory lectures on the overall research process, and each seminar assignment will be introduced by a lecture. In order to introduce students to concrete examples of how research may relate to development cooperation work, at least one of the assignments will follow processes and applied research methods relevant for development cooperation and associated consultancy work. Examination Examination of this course is through seminar assignments and the formulation of a dissertation memo. Grades are awarded according to the scale "failed", "pass" or "pass with distinction". Examination is based on the written seminar assignment as well as on active participation in the seminars. For the grade "pass" it is required that the student will have handed in all assignments and acquired the grade "pass" and actively participated in all the seminars.

Instruction

The teaching consists of lectures, seminars, video films, and study visits.

Assessment

The first two parts of the course are examined by means of a written test and assignments. The third part is examined by means of assignment and active participation in the seminars. An opportunity for a re-test is given ca 3-4 weeks after the first exam. The time and place for the written tests is announced in the schedule on the net. Grades are awarded according the scale "failed", "pass" or "pass with distinction". To get the grade "pass with distinction" for the whole A course that grade is needed for at least 15 points of the totally 30 points.

Course level in relation to degree requirements

The students will develop their ability to critically analyse, understand and deal with, both orally and in writing, some relatively advanced texts from the central research fields of political science. The course gives the students an opportunity to reflect upon the requirements of a scientific discussion. Special attention is thereby given to the art of conveying the thoughts of others in an analytically meaningful way; the need for a concept formation of one's own "an instrument of analysis" for the characterisation and comparison of different ideas, and the importance of dealing with relevant critique in order to support one's own thesis. The student is expected to contribute actively with his own views, and there will be practice in oral presentations of the acquired knowledge.
On completion of the course the student is expected to have obtained the necessary knowledge and competence to define research problems as well as carrying out and assessing empirical studies of a simple but yet qualitative kind. The course thereby provides the student with the knowledge and understanding of some basic methodological questions in the field of social science. The skills practiced include the competence to identify, formulate and seek answers to political science problems; the ability to define and carry out an assignment within given time limits; the ability to present and discuss information, problems and solutions, orally as well as in the written form; the ability to work independently with research problems and various project assignments.

Reading list

Reading list

Applies from: week 35, 2011

Some titles may be available electronically through the University library.

  • Cooper, Frederick Africa since 1940 : the past of the present

    Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2002

    Find in the library

    Mandatory

  • Havnevik, Kjell The Land Question in Sub-Saharan Africa

    SLU/Currents IRDCurrents 15:4-9, 1997

    Mandatory

  • Hettne, Björn Thinking about development : development matters

    London: Zed Books, 2009

    Find in the library

    Mandatory

  • Larson, Brooke. Trials of nation making : liberalism, race, and ethnicity in the Andes, 1810-1910

    New York: Cambridge University Press, 2004

    Find in the library

    Mandatory

  • Johnson, Gordon; Metcalf, Thomas R. The new Cambridge history of India. : 3 [The Indian empire and the beginnings of modern society], 4 Ideologies of the Raj

    Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1996

    Find in the library

    Mandatory

  • Panayiotopoulos, Prodromos Ioannou; Capps, Gavin World development : an introduction

    London: Pluto, 2001

    Find in the library

    Mandatory

  • Washbrook, David India 1818-1860: The Two Faces of Colonialism

    Part of:

    Louis, William Roger; Low, Alaine; Porter, Andrew The Oxford history of the British Empire. : Vol. 3 The nineteenth century

    Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1999

    vol. 3 (1999) s. 395-421

    Find in the library

    Mandatory

  • Tarrow, Sidney G. Power in movement : social movements and contentious politics

    2. ed.: Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1998

    Find in the library

    Mandatory

  • Utdrag ur böcker och artiklar,

    Find in the library

    Mandatory

  • Fler artiklar och bokkapitel/More articles

    --,

    Mandatory

  • Fler utdrag ur böcker och artiklar/More articles and book chapters

    --,

    Mandatory

  • Meyer, D.S.; Minkoff, D.C. Conceptualizing political opportunity

    Social Forces, 2004

    Mandatory

  • Keck, Margaret E.; Sikkink, Kathryn Transnational advocacy networks in international and regional politics

    Part of:

    International social science journal.

    vol. 51 nr. 159 s. 89-101

    Find in the library

    Mandatory

  • Escobar, Arturo Beyond the Third World : imperial globality, global coloniality and anti-globalisation social movements

    Part of:

    Third world quarterly : journal of emerging areas

    Find in the library

    Mandatory

  • Fraser, Nancy Social Justice in globalisation: Redistribution, recognition and participation

    Published in Eurozine by Revisita Crítica de Ciencias Sociais, 2003

    http://www.eurozine.com/articles/2003-01-24-fraser-en.html

    Mandatory

  • Veltmeyer, Henry New Social Movements in Latin America: The Dynamics of Class and Identity.

    The Journal of Peasent Studies, 1997

    Mandatory

  • Crook, R Decentralisation and Poverty Reduction in Africa: The Politics of Local-Central Relations

    Public Administration and Development, 2003

    Mandatory

  • Devas, N; Delay, S Local Democracy and the Challenges of Decentralising of the State: An International Perspective

    Local Government Studies,

    Mandatory

  • Manor, J Perspectives on Decentralisation

    Swedish International Centre for Local Democracy, ICLD, 2011

    Download here

    Mandatory

  • Oluwu, D; Wunsch, J.S. Local Governance in Africa

    Lynne Rienner Publishers., 2004

    Mandatory

  • Change for freedom : policy for democratic development and human rights in Swedish development cooperation, 2010-2014

    Stockholm: Ministry for Foreign Affairs, Regeringskansliet, 2010

    Find in the library

    Mandatory

  • Global challenges - our responsibility : communication on Sweden's policy for global development

    Stockholm: Ministry for Foreign Affairs, Regeringskansliet, 2008

    Find in the library

    Mandatory

  • Petit, Jethro Power analysis: a practical guide for Sida country teams

    Sida, draft

    Mandatory

  • Working material and reports on Tanzania

    (ToR, Tender, Report, Country Strategy etc.),

    Mandatory

  • Artiklar

    Find in the library

    Mandatory

  • Mikkelsen, Britha Methods for development work and research : a new guide for practitioners

    2. ed.: New Delhi: Sage, 2005

    Find in the library

    Mandatory

  • Morgan, David L. Focus groups as qualitative research

    2. ed., [rev.]: Thousand Oaks, Calif.: Sage, cop. 1997

    Find in the library

    Mandatory

  • Burnham, Peter Research methods in politics

    Basingstoke: Palgrave, 2004

    Find in the library

    Mandatory

  • Maynard, Mary; Purvis, June Researching women's lives or studying women's oppression? Reflections on what constitutes feminist research

    -, 2005

    Mandatory