Syllabus for Introduction to Indian Philosophy

Introduktion till indisk filosofi

Syllabus

  • 7.5 credits
  • Course code: 5JN011
  • Education cycle: First cycle
  • Main field(s) of study and in-depth level: Indology G1N

    Explanation of codes

    The code indicates the education cycle and in-depth level of the course in relation to other courses within the same main field of study according to the requirements for general degrees:

    First cycle

    • G1N: has only upper-secondary level entry requirements
    • G1F: has less than 60 credits in first-cycle course/s as entry requirements
    • G1E: contains specially designed degree project for Higher Education Diploma
    • G2F: has at least 60 credits in first-cycle course/s as entry requirements
    • G2E: has at least 60 credits in first-cycle course/s as entry requirements, contains degree project for Bachelor of Arts/Bachelor of Science
    • GXX: in-depth level of the course cannot be classified

    Second cycle

    • A1N: has only first-cycle course/s as entry requirements
    • A1F: has second-cycle course/s as entry requirements
    • A1E: contains degree project for Master of Arts/Master of Science (60 credits)
    • A2E: contains degree project for Master of Arts/Master of Science (120 credits)
    • AXX: in-depth level of the course cannot be classified

  • Grading system: Fail (U), Pass (G), Pass with distinction (VG)
  • Established: 2014-10-22
  • Established by: The Department Board
  • Revised: 2015-09-16
  • Revised by: The Department Board
  • Applies from: week 38, 2015
  • Entry requirements: General entry requirements
  • Responsible department: Department of Linguistics and Philology

Decisions and guidelines

The course is given as an independent course.

Learning outcomes

In order to pass, the student must at the end of the course be able to:

  • identify the main areas, problems, and Sanskrit concepts of Indian Philosophy;
  • approach critically, summarise, and explain orally and in a written form short fragments of text of and on Indian Philosophy;
  • begin to relate and compare problems of Indian Philosophy within a wider philosophic discourse;
  • create their own short texts critically analysing one specific topic of Indian Philosophy.

Content

The course contains the following thematic units:

  • What is Indian Philosophy? Definition of Indian Philosophy as an area of academic inquiry.
  • Who am I? Philosophy of the Self (ātman).
  • What is Brahman? Philosophy of the absolute (brahman).
  • How do I know? Inquiry into the means of knowledge (pramāṇavāda).
  • What can I know? Inquiry into the range of the knowable (prameyavāda).
  • What is the highest good? Inquiry into liberation (mokṣa).

Instruction

The teaching consists of lectures, exercises, group work, and examinatory parts. The student's own learning activities are essential for completion of the course.

Assessment

The assessment of the course consists of three different parts:

  • Part A. Formative assessment: throughout the course three different methods for Assessing Skill in Synthesis and Creative Thinking will be used: a) Word Journal, b) Approximate Analogies, and c) Concept Maps.
  • Part B. Group Work: the class will be divided in small groups which will have to a) choose among five topics (reflected in a fragment of text) facilitated by the instructor, b) document, summarise, contextualise, and present the chosen topic to the other groups in a formal class presentation. Each group performance of Group Work will be assessed by peers and by the instructor. Final assessment of Group Work will result from a combination of peers' assessment and the assessment of the instructor. Both group assessment and instructor assessment of Group Work will follow the above specified criteria.
  • Part C. Final examination: text analysis (three texts will be provided, the students choose one) to be written at home.

Syllabus Revisions

Reading list

Reading list

Applies from: week 38, 2015

Some titles may be available electronically through the University library.

  • Bartley, Christopher An introduction to Indian philosophy

    London: Continuum, 2011

    Find in the library

  • King, Richard Indian philosophy : an introduction to hindu and buddhist thought

    Edinburgh: Edinburgh Univ. Press, cop. 1999

    Find in the library

  • Krishna, Daya Indian philosophy : a counter perspective

    Delhi: Oxford University Press, 1991

    Find in the library

  • Mohanty, Jitendranath Classical Indian philosophy

    Lanham, Md.: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 1999

    Find in the library

  • Sarma, Deepak Classical Indian philosophy : a reader

    New York: Columbia University Press, 2011

    Find in the library