Syllabus for English C1

Engelska C1

Syllabus

  • 30 credits
  • Course code: 5EN132
  • Education cycle: First cycle
  • Main field(s) of study and in-depth level: English G2E

    Explanation of codes

    The code indicates the education cycle and in-depth level of the course in relation to other courses within the same main field of study according to the requirements for general degrees:

    First cycle
    G1N: has only upper-secondary level entry requirements
    G1F: has less than 60 credits in first-cycle course/s as entry requirements
    G1E: contains specially designed degree project for Higher Education Diploma
    G2F: has at least 60 credits in first-cycle course/s as entry requirements
    G2E: has at least 60 credits in first-cycle course/s as entry requirements, contains degree project for Bachelor of Arts/Bachelor of Science
    GXX: in-depth level of the course cannot be classified.

    Second cycle
    A1N: has only first-cycle course/s as entry requirements
    A1F: has second-cycle course/s as entry requirements
    A1E: contains degree project for Master of Arts/Master of Science (60 credits)
    A2E: contains degree project for Master of Arts/Master of Science (120 credits)
    AXX: in-depth level of the course cannot be classified.

  • Grading system: Fail (U), Pass (G), Pass with distinction (VG)
  • Established: 2006-12-07
  • Established by: The Faculty Board of Languages
  • Revised: 2018-04-12
  • Revised by: The Department Board
  • Applies from: week 01, 2019
  • Entry requirements: English A1 and English B1
  • Responsible department: Department of English

Learning outcomes

Upon completing the course students will have the competence to carry out an independent examination and account of a delimited topic in literature in English, or English linguistics. Students will also have acquired an even deeper knowledge in one of the areas of literature in English or English linguistics.

The goals for each course component are given below.

Component 1. Degree Project (15 credits)
Upon completing the component students will be able to

  • apply an analytical approach to the material
  • show a basic familiarity with formal aspects of academic writing
  • independently formulate and delimit a research question and select suitable primary sources
  • search for academic literature
  • critically evaluate both primary material and secondary sources
  • show insights into a selected subject area and critical issues in this area
  • show a knowledge of certain literary or, alternatively, linguistic methods of analysis
  • treat a delimited question in a paper, in correct English, observing academic methods and conventional principles of form
  • actively and independently participate in seminar discussions and present their own work
  • fulfil the role of peer reviewer in a final ventilation seminar
  • independently defend their own degree project
  • present their research findings in a clear and structured manner.

Component 2. Writing American Selves: Fictional and Non-Fictional Self-Portraiture (7.5 credits)
Upon completing the component students will be able to
  • show good insights into the genre of autobiography and its variants
  • show an awareness of the importance of the gender perspective and ethnicity in texts belonging to the genre
  • show some familiarity with the critical conversation about the genre of autobiography
  • apply an academic approach to primary and secondary literature
  • present a literary analysis orally and in writing with greater independence and with greater linguistic correctness
  • actively and independently participate in seminar discussions.

Component 3. English Literature and the Canon: Tradition and Innovation (7.5 credits)
Upon completing the component students will be able to
  • show deeper insights into the 19th-century novel and selected modernist literary works
  • show a deeper knowledge of literary genres
  • show greater insights into various perspectives in literary theory
  • show a knowledge of critical perspectives such as gender theory and post-colonialism
  • apply an academic approach to primary and secondary literature
  • present a literary analysis orally and in writing with greater independence and with greater linguistic correctness
  • actively and independently participate in seminar discussions.

Component 4. Communities, Speakers, Texts: Pragmatic and Sociolinguistic Perspectives on English (7.5 credits)
Upon completing the course students will be able to
  • use appropriate sociolinguistic terminology in accounting for variation in the English language
  • demonstrate a command of the terminology used to describe contextually influenced linguistic meaning
  • demonstrate knowledge of the major theories and frameworks that guide research in pragmatics and sociolinguistics
  • summarise important findings in research in sociolinguistics and pragmatics
  • complete a small-scale research project analysing authentic language data
  • write a short research paper making appropriate use of primary and secondary sources
  • actively and independently participate in seminar discussions.

Component 5. Investigating the structure of English then and now: from elne mycle to with great zeal (7.5 credits)
Upon completing the component students will be able to
  • name and describe important morphological and syntactic features of Old and Present-day English
  • identify morphological and syntactic structures in Old and Present-day English
  • discuss morphological and syntactic topics in correct English, both orally and in writing
  • analyse authentic Old and Present-day English text morphologically and syntactically
  • construct short stretches of Old and Present-day English text according to morphological and syntactic specifications
  • compare and contrast different accounts of English morphology and syntax in secondary sources
  • actively and independently participate in seminar discussions.

Content

The course comprises a set component, a degree project worth 15 credits. Along with this, students select two of several elective advanced components, each worth 7.5 credits. In Component 1, Degree project, there are three main specialisations: American literature, English literature, and English linguistics.

Component 1. Degree Project 15.0 hp

The component provides a general background to a given subject area in one of the main specialisations and treats relevant issues involved in academic writing and methods, individually or in groups.

The choice of topic within the subject area, which may vary from one semester to another, is decided in consultation between the student and the teacher/supervisor.

Examples of subject areas with specialisation in American or English literature: issues in literary criticism, literary history, sociology of literature, and teaching of literature.

Examples of subject areas with specialisation in linguistics: selected issues in phonology, grammar, variation analysis, language history, sociology of language, text linguistics, vocabulary, name research, translation, language teaching, language methodology.

In exceptional cases, following consultation with the teacher/supervisor, topics outside the given areas may be accepted. Once the topic has been determined, individual supervision of the degree project starts. The degree project will normally be presented at a seminar where one or more students are assigned to present their views on the project.

Component 2. Writing American Selves 7.5 hp

The component analyses selected American literary works from the middle of the 17th century to the present. The texts are chosen from a broad spectrum of fiction and poetry, more traditional autobiographies, and hybrid forms. The emphasis lies on issues of “truth,” gender, race, ethnicity, and morality. Basic concepts and methods of literary criticism are applied.

Component 3. English Literature and the Canon 7.5 hp

The component analyses selected English literary works with the emphasis on the 19th-century novel and various modernist genres. The influence and reflection of social developments in literature are addressed, as are the perspectives of cultural and literary history. Basic concepts and methods of literary criticism are applied.

Component 4. Communities, Speakers, Texts 7.5 hp

This component examines how the English language varies in use according to contextual factors. By applying theories and analytical frameworks from the fields of pragmatics and sociolinguistics, we discover how speakers and writers use the English language to communicate meanings, carry out actions, signal membership in speech communities, and achieve styles in talk and writing. In the pragmatics portion of the component, we consider the ways in which meaning is context dependent and the ways in which speakers achieve goals using language. In the sociolinguistics portion of the component, we analyse the linguistic resources with which speakers show their connection to a given community and express identity. Students will use primarily qualitative research methods to complete assignments and short research papers.

Comp. 5. Investigating the Structure of English Then and Now 7.5 hp

This component examines morphology and syntax in English texts from two time periods. While inflections played an important role in Old English grammar, Present-day English relies primarily on structures where word order and function words are of central importance. Students thus investigate morphological and syntactic aspects of Old and Present-day English texts. Through independent research projects, students also learn how to apply methods of morphosyntactic analysis to authentic texts in order to describe the structure of English.
 

Instruction

Component 1. Degree Project
Group instruction and individual supervision. Supervision in Component 1 is given during the semester the student is registered for the first time and to some extent during the immediately following semester. No further supervision may be expected thereafter.

Elective components, components 2–5
Group instruction.

Active participation in course seminars is obligatory. In cases of absence students will be given the opportunity to complete an extra assignment within the framework of the course period.

Assessment

Component 1. Degree Project
The examination consists of the production and defence of a degree project representing an examination of a delimited topic in American or British literature or English linguistics, which is presented in English in a paper that applies conventional formal principles. The scope is about 8000 words. Beyond this each student must perform a critical review of another student’s degree project.

In assessing degree projects, attention will be paid primarily to the student’s ability to independently address a problem area and systematically report the preconditions, outline, execution, and findings of the work and, secondarily, to the form of the work in terms of its fulfilment of formal criteria and linguistic correctness. Projects receiving the grade of Pass with distinction must satisfy both academic and linguistic criteria of excellence.

Grades used are either Fail, Pass, or Pass with Distinction.

Components 2-5
Examination in the various components is done in the form of oral presentations, written assignments, and written final examinations. Grades used are either Fail, Pass, or Pass with Distinction. Grades used are either Fail, Pass, or Pass with Distinction.

Students who do not achieve a passing grade on the regular examination will have another opportunity to take the examination within a reasonable period of time after the regular examination.

Students who fail a certain examination twice have the right upon request, following consultation with the head of department, to have another examiner appointed.

To receive a grade of Pass with Distinction for the whole course, students must have achieved the grade of Pass with Distinction in components worth a total of at least 20 higher education credits.

Transitional provisions

For transitional regulations in the case of changes in the syllabus, please contact the student adviser.

Other directives

The course cannot be counted toward a degree together with the courses English C2, C2L, C3, C4, C4L, HS3, HS4, HS5, T3 or Degree project English C/D.

Students who have failed to pass examinations based on continuous assessment may take the component again if a place is available. In exceptional cases a special examination may be arranged.

Results that are more than five years old are normally not recognised if the syllabus for the course component has been changed.

If the syllabus or course reading for a component has been changed, students have a right to be examined under the original syllabus and course reading on at least three occasions during the following three semesters. Normally this right then expires. Otherwise there are no limitations on the number of examination opportunities.

Supervision in Component 1 is given during the semester the student is registered for the first time and to some extent during the immediately following semester. No further supervision may be expected thereafter.

Reading list

Reading list

Applies from: week 27, 2020

American and English Literature Specialisation. Secondary Reading

  • Culler, Jonathan Literary theory : a very short introduction.

    Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2000, c1997

    Find in the library

Material within the selected subject.

Langauge Specialisation. Main Reading

  • Falk, Angela Thinking and writing in academic contexts : a university companion

    1. ed.: Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2011

    Find in the library

    Mandatory

Handout with articles about theory and methodology. Material within the selected subject.

Reference and additional material Linguistics

  • Lagerholm, Per Språkvetenskapliga uppsatser

    2. uppl.: Studentlitteratur AB, 2010

    Find in the library

Component 2: Writing American Selves: Fictional and Non-Fictional Self-Portraiture, 7.5 credits

Main Reading

  • Douglass, Frederick Andrews, William L.; McFeely, William S. Narrative of the life of Frederick Douglass, an American slave, written by himself : authoritative text contexts criticism

    Second edition.: New York: W.W. Norton & Company, 2017

    Find in the library

    Mandatory

  • Leaves of grass and other writings : authoritative texts, other poetry and prose, criticism Whitman, Walt Moon, Michael; Bradley, Sculley; Blodgett, Harold William

    New York: Norton, 2001

    Find in the library

    Mandatory

  • Antin, Mary; Sollors, Werner The promised land

    London: Penguin, 1997

    Find in the library

    Mandatory

  • Stein, Gertrude The autobiography of Alice B. Toklas

    Vintage Books ed.: New York: Vintage Books, 1990

    Find in the library

    Mandatory

  • Wright, Richard 1908-1960 Black boy (American hunger) : a record of childhood and youth

    1st HarperPerennial ed.: HarperPerennial:

    Find in the library

    Mandatory

  • Kingston, Maxine Hong The woman warrior : memoirs of a girlhood among ghosts

    Vintage international ed.: New York: Vintage international, 1989

    Find in the library

    Mandatory

  • Coates, Ta-Nehisi Between the world and me

    Melbourne, Victoria: Text Publishing Company, 2015

    Find in the library

    Mandatory

Selected texts online or Student Portal.

Component 3. English Literature and the Canon: Tradition and Innovation, 7.5 credits

Main Reading

  • Achebe, Chinua Things fall apart

    [New ed.]: London: Penguin in association with Heinemann African Writers Series, 2001

    Find in the library

    Mandatory

  • Carter, Angela Wise children

    [New ed.]: London: Vintage, 1992

    Find in the library

    Mandatory

  • Conrad, Joseph Armstrong, Paul B. Heart of darkness : authoritative text, backgrounds and contexts, criticism

    4. ed.: New York ;a London: W.W. Norton, 2006

    Find in the library

    Mandatory

  • Dickens, Charles; Douglas-Fairhurst, Robert Cardwell, Margaret Great expectations

    New ed.: Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2008.

    Find in the library

    Mandatory

  • Gray, Alasdair. Poor things : episodes from the early life of Archibald McCandless M. D. Scottish public health officer

    [Paperback ed.]: London: Bloomsbury, c1992, 2002

    Find in the library

    Mandatory

  • Jones, Lloyd Mister Pip

    London: Murray, 2008

    Find in the library

    Mandatory

  • Shakespeare, William; Hibbard, G. R. Hamlet

    Find in the library

    Mandatory

  • Shelley, Mary Wollstonecraft; Hindle, Maurice Frankenstein : or the modern Prometheus

    Rev. ed.: London: Penguin, 2003

    Find in the library

    Mandatory

Selected literary criticism.

Component. 4. Communities, Speakers, Texts, 7.5 credits

Main Reading

  • Meyerhoff, Miriam Introducing sociolinguistics

    Third edition.: 2019

    Find in the library

    Mandatory

  • Cutting, Joan. Pragmatics : a resource book for students

    Third edition.: Routledge: Milton Park, Abingdon, Oxon, 2015.

    Find in the library

    Mandatory

  • The Cambridge Handbook of Pragmatics

    Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2012

    Find in the library

  • Thomas, Jenny Meaning in interaction : an introduction to pragmatics

    London: Longman, 1995

    Find in the library

Component 5. Investigating the structure of English then and now, 7.5 credits

Main Reading

  • Aarts, Bas English syntax and argumentation

    Fifth Edition.: London: Palgrave Macmillan, 2018

    Find in the library

    Mandatory

  • Hogg, Richard M.; Alcorn, Rhona. An introduction to Old English

    2nd ed.: Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, c2012.

    Also available as paperback edition.

    Find in the library

    Mandatory

Reading list revisions